Yo-yo dieting may make it harder for women to control a variety of heart disease risk factors, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2019, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population-based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

“Achieving a healthy weight is generally recommended as heart healthy but maintaining weight loss is difficult and fluctuations in weight may make it harder to achieve ideal cardiovascular health,” said Brooke Aggarwal, Ed.D., M.S., senior author of the study and assistant professor of medical sciences at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York.

Investigators studied 485 women (average age 37 years, 61 percent racial/ethnic minorities, average body mass index 26, in the overweight range) participating in the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women Strategically Focused Research Network at Columbia University in New York City. Women reported how many times (other than during pregnancies) they had lost at least 10 pounds, only to regain the weight within a year. They were assessed on American Heart Association’s — Life’s Simple 7, a measure of how well people control important heart disease risk factors (including body mass index, cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar, smoking, physical activity and diet).

Read more at American Heart Association