Health

Lifting Haiti’s Poor One Nutritional Shaved Iced Cone at a Time

The World Poverty Clock records more than 597 million of the world’s population living in extreme poverty. The UN’s top Sustainable Development Goal, SDG1 is “Ending Extreme Poverty”. And one social enterprise is shifting the paradigm of poverty reduction, offering the poor a self-help business model. The Portsmouth, NH based nonprofit organization Social Ventures Foundation

2019-06-23T07:49:01-05:00Tags: |

Does Medicine Really Expire?

Ever since 1979, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has required that pharmaceutical companies put expiration dates on prescription and over-the-counter medicines. That doesn't mean your bottle of ibuprofen will go bad in the same way as, say, an expired carton of milk. The date that you see printed on a pill bottle is

2019-06-18T02:51:48-05:00Tags: |

Prescription for Poverty

New Oxfam research shows that four pharmaceutical corporations—Abbott, Johnson & Johnson, Merck & CO (MSD), and Pfizer—systematically stash their profits in overseas tax havens. They appear to deprive developing countries of more than $100 million every year—money that is urgently needed to meet the health needs of people in these countries—while vastly overcharging for their

2019-06-16T14:52:07-05:00Tags: |

Researchers uncover indoor pollution hazards

When most people think about air pollution, they think of summertime haze, traffic or smokestack exhaust, wintertime inversions, or wildfire smoke. They rarely think of the air that they breathe inside their own homes. In a new study of indoor air quality, a team of WSU researchers has found surprisingly high levels of pollutants, including

Some supplements are linked to severe health events

Consumption of dietary supplements sold for weight loss, muscle building, and energy was associated with increased risk for severe medical events in children and young adults compared with consumption of vitamins, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study, published today in the Journal of Adolescent Health, found

2019-06-10T19:04:57-05:00Tags: |

Early-life challenges affect how children focus, face the day

Adversity early in life tends to affect a child's executive function skills -- their ability to focus, for example, or organize tasks. Experiences such as poverty, residential instability, or parental divorce or substance abuse, also can lead to changes in a child's brain chemistry, muting the effects of stress hormones. These hormones rise to help

2019-06-05T20:01:47-05:00Tags: |

Brush your teeth — postpone Alzheimer’s

You don't only avoid holes in your teeth by keeping good oral hygiene, researchers at the University of Bergen have discovered a clear connection between gum disease and Alzheimer´s disease. The researchers have determined that gum disease (gingivitis) plays a decisive role in whether a person developes Alzheimer´s or not. "We discovered DNA-based proof that

2019-06-05T19:37:46-05:00Tags: |

Collusion over Drug Prices: Will Generic Manufacturers Pay?

A lawsuit filed by a group of 44 U.S. states against 20 generic drug makers alleging collusion and price-fixing has revealed how existing market-based, competitive mechanisms fail to protect consumers, according to experts. The complaint, filed in the U.S. District Court in Connecticut, says that drug companies have since 2012 discreetly engaged with each other on price

Health Care Benefits of Combining Wearables and AI

In southeast England, patients discharged from a group of hospitals serving 500,000 people are being fitted with a Wi-Fi-enabled armband that remotely monitors vital signs such as respiratory rate, oxygen levels, pulse, blood pressure, and body temperature. Under a National Health Service pilot program that now incorporates artificial intelligence to analyze all that patient data

2019-06-05T02:32:03-05:00Tags: |

Lessons From the Great Antioxidant Lie

Antioxidants have been hailed as health game changers for over a quarter-century. When originally buzzed back in the early 1990s, the compounds, which include beta-carotene, Vitamin E, and glutathione, were predicted to protect against various cancers, heart disease, and neurodegradation. They'd do this by halting the spread of free radicals in the body, molecules with

2019-06-03T06:29:02-05:00Tags: |

Human Role In Spread Of Hospital Infections

People treated in hospitals and other health care settings are increasingly at risk of infection with multidrug-resistant bacteria. Many of these microbes produce enzymes called extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), which make them resistant to antibiotics. Understanding how ESBL bacteria spread from person to person is key to developing effective prevention strategies. An observational study conducted in

2019-06-01T06:59:20-05:00Tags: |

Energy drinks may increase risk of heart function..

Drinking 32 ounces of an energy drink in a short timespan may increase blood pressure and the risk of electrical disturbances in the heart, which affect heart rhythm, according to a small study published in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. The study enrolled

2019-05-30T07:21:52-05:00Tags: |

Unsafe levels of antibiotics in world’s rivers

Concentrations of antibiotics found in some of the world's rivers exceed 'safe' levels by up to 300 times, the first ever global study has discovered. Researchers looked for 14 commonly used antibiotics in rivers in 72 countries across six continents and found antibiotics at 65% of the sites monitored. Metronidazole, which is used to treat

2019-05-30T07:15:28-05:00Tags: |

How Some Generic Drugs Could Do More Harm Than Good

For the 16 years that Dr. Brian Westerberg, a Canadian surgeon, worked volunteer missions at the Mulago National Referral Hospital in Kampala, Uganda, scarcity was the norm. The patients usually exceeded the 1,500 allotted beds. Running water was once cut off when the debt-ridden hospital was unable to pay its bills. On some of his

New compound kills antibiotic-resistant superbugs

A new compound which visualises and kills antibiotic resistant superbugs has been discovered by scientists at the University of Sheffield and Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). The team, led by Professor Jim Thomas, from the University of Sheffield's Department of Chemistry, is testing new compounds developed by his PhD student Kirsty Smitten on antibiotic resistant gram-negative

2019-05-28T06:46:12-05:00Tags: |