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Pharmaceutical abuse sent more than 350,000 people to the ER in 2016

The misuse of prescription drugs and over-the-counter medications resulted in an estimated 358,000 trips to U.S. emergency departments in 2016 — and almost half of those cases involved young people ages 15 to 34, according to a new study based on a national public health surveillance system. The analysis, reported online March 6 in the

2019-03-18T10:58:33-05:00Tags: |

Young child goes to ED for medicine poisoning every 10 minutes

(HealthDay)—The number of children younger than age 6 years treated at U.S. emergency departments for medicine poisonings has declined in recent years, but there were still nearly 52,000 cases in 2017, a new report says. That is an average of 142 cases per day or one every 10 minutes, CNN reported. Between 2010 and 2016,

2019-03-18T10:52:33-05:00Tags: |

The answer to the UK’s renewable energy future is blowing in the wind

Auctions for new capacity held in 2017 resulted in deals at half the price of those signed just two years prior, while we are seeing a steady drumbeat of new records relating to clean power production. Just last month, the world’s largest offshore wind farm began generating power. Anchored to the seabed 75 miles off

2019-03-18T10:44:28-05:00Tags: |

Study of low-income American women finds that small loans can help them a little

For a while, microfinance was the hottest trend in global development. The promise? That you could transform a poor person’s life with a very small loan that would let them start their own business — and then the lender gets their money back, which could then go on to transform someone else’s life. That early

2019-03-18T10:40:12-05:00Tags: |

How An ESOP Made All The Difference For An Early Entrant Into The Craft Beer Business

Before there was a craft brewery on every corner, there was Mass Bay Brewing Company. Founded on Boston’s waterfront by Dan Kenary, Richard Doyle and George Ligeti, Mass Bay was in the vanguard of the current craft beer movement. A postgraduation trip to Europe in 1982 had introduced college friends Kenary and Doyle to the

Rainfall changes for key crops predicted

Even if humans radically reduce greenhouse gas emissions soon, important crop-growing regions of the world can expect changes to rainfall patterns by 2040. In fact, some regions are already experiencing new climatic regimes compared with just a generation ago. The study, published March 11 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, warns that up

2019-03-16T08:37:14-05:00Tags: |

Relatives with Alzheimer’s linked to higher risk

Having a parent with Alzheimer's disease has been known to raise a person's risk of developing the disease, but new research suggests that having second- and third-degree relatives who have had Alzheimer's may also increase risk. The study is published in the March 13, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American

2019-03-16T08:27:32-05:00Tags: |

Tectonics in the tropics trigger Earth’s ice ages

Over the last 540 million years, the Earth has weathered three major ice ages -- periods during which global temperatures plummeted, producing extensive ice sheets and glaciers that have stretched beyond the polar caps. Now scientists at MIT, the University of California at Santa Barbara, and the University of California at Berkeley have identified the

2019-03-16T08:10:19-05:00Tags: |

Londa Schiebinger: Why does gender matter?

Conventional seat belts do not fit pregnant women properly and motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of fetal death related to maternal trauma. Analyses of sex differences have led to the development of pregnant crash test dummies that enhance safety in automobile testing and design. In medicine, osteoporosis has been conceptualized primarily as a

2019-03-13T10:46:49-05:00Tags: |

‘Medieval’ Diseases Flare As Unsanitary Living Conditions Proliferate

Jennifer Millar keeps trash bags and hand sanitizer near her tent, and she regularly pours water mixed with hydrogen peroxide on the sidewalk nearby. Keeping herself and the patch of concrete she calls home clean is a top priority. But this homeless encampment off a Hollywood freeway ramp is often littered with needles and trash,

2019-03-13T09:44:38-05:00Tags: |

Five Practices for Developing and Staying Accountable to Racial Equity Goals

The connection between impact investing and our foundation’s commitment to advancing diversity, equity, and inclusion comes up for us every day at The California Endowment (The Endowment). As a health funder, we know race and structural racism drive health inequality and lifespan differences between communities, and we have emphasized the importance of diversity and racial

Environment damage behind 1 in 4 global deaths, disease: UN

A quarter of all premature deaths and diseases worldwide are due to manmade pollution and environmental damage, the United Nations said Wednesday in a landmark report on the planet's parlous state. Deadly smog-inducing emissions, chemicals polluting drinking water, and the accelerating destruction of ecosystems crucial to the livelihoods of billions of people are driving a

2019-03-13T09:31:09-05:00Tags: |

How FEED Projects Is On A Mission To Combat Childhood Hunger

Kicking off a series of profiles of inspiring women leaders, in celebration of International Women's Month, is Sarah Naseer, the President of FEED Projects. FEED is a social enterprise founded in 2007 by Lauren Bush Lauren that has provided over 100 million meals to children around the world to date. I sat down with Naseer to

Businesses ‘doing good’? Prove it

Social businesses trying to solve a diverse range of problems, from homelessness to gender inequality, the refugee crisis to plastic pollution often share the same conundrum – how to measure success. In an era of greater transparency, consumers and investors increasingly expect companies to look beyond profits and report their environmental and social impact. For

Q&A: Stanford energy experts discuss whether batteries can replace natural gas..

As the mix of energy sources feeding power-hungry homes, businesses and industry comes to incorporate more renewables like wind and solar, society faces a reckoning with where to turn when wind and sunshine die down. What will it take for greener sources not only to join fossil fuels on the American power grid, but eventually

2019-03-13T10:41:49-05:00Tags: |

Opioid Litigation Brings Company Secrets Into The Public Eye

America's big drugmakers and pharmacy chains are scrambling to respond to hundreds of lawsuits tied to the deadly opioid epidemic. Billions of dollars are at stake if the companies are found liable for fueling the crisis. Even before judgments are rendered, companies like Purdue Pharma, Johnson & Johnson and CVS are already suffering damage to

2019-03-13T09:40:42-05:00Tags: |

New Mexico is the third state to legally require 100% renewable electricity

As Congressional leaders in Washington, DC remain stalled out on climate-related legislation, states are moving forward, even in conservative parts of the country. New Mexico is the latest. The southwestern state is the latest to embrace carbon-free electricity, passing a bill that will require all electricity from public utilities to come from carbon-free sources. The

2019-03-14T12:45:36-05:00Tags: |